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Category: Tips

THIS IS NOT A DRILL: Poor Interface Design and its Potentially Dangerous Impact

As most of you know, this past Saturday morning, the people of Hawaii got a shocking notification on their smartphones warning of a incoming ballistic missile and that this warning was not a drill. I can only imagine the fear that raced through the minds of more than a million people. This warning, as well all now know, turned out to be a false alarm accidentally set off by a state employee who was attempting to perform an internal test.

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Control Subclass Constructors

A constructor is a special method that is used to initialize a class. They are very handy, but when you use them with control subclasses you have to be aware of how a control’s properties are initialized. Perhaps you’ve run into this situation:

“I have a constructor on my control and the values that I set in the constructor don’t stick.”

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8 Ways to Market Your App for Free

Though marketing may not be your forte, there are things you can do that are very effective in promoting your app and building your customer base. You can try some of the paid options and get varying results, but there are many free things you can do that can have a huge impact. We’ve already blogged about using Twitter to market your app for free.

Here’s a list of 8 additional ways your marketing team of 1 can promote your app at no cost:

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The Best Cross-Platform Secret Weapon You’ve Never Heard Of

In today’s world, the only way to be sure you are reaching all your potential customers is to target multiple platforms. But cross-platform development is crazy-hard, right? Perhaps, if you are using tools like Java, Qt, Delphi or Xamarin it certainly can be. But with Xojo, cross-platform apps are simple to create.

In fact, Xojo lets you easily cross-compile desktop apps for Windows, macOS, Linux and Raspberry Pi. Plus, you can use the same Xojo language to create web and iOS apps too (Android coming soon!).

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Aren’t those Xojo keywords?

Many times we get bug reports or feature requests about issues with keywords not highlighting or being colorized in the code editor. But are those words actually language “keywords” or reserved words in Xojo?

In reality none of the intrinsic types are reserved words. They’re just types in the global namespace. Xojo knows where a type name is required and it will only look for types in that context. The opposite holds true as well. In effect, the types are treated as if they live in their own namespace.

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