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Category: Windows

Posts related to Windows-specific development.

Building for Windows/Linux on Newer Macs

We have discovered what we believe to be a bug in OS X Mavericks specifically on newer Macs. Apple started using Intel’s new Haswell processor in the MacBook Air in June, the iMac in September and the MacBook Pro in October. When you build for either Windows or Linux from OS X, any images you dragged into your project are converted to BMP format. The bug we discovered (which we have reported to Apple – RADAR case 15546907) results in a banding of the converted graphic.

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Writing High-DPI Aware Windows Apps

Today’s laptops and monitors support high resolution displays which allow you to pack more information and content on the screen. Although one common complaint is that people find the text to be too small at the maximum resolution, Windows’ solution to this is the ability for the user to adjust the DPI setting.

SetDPI.png

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Guest Post: Running Xojo Apps on Windows with Elevated UAC

We’d like to thank Wayne Golding for offering the following tip. Wayne Golding has been a Xojo developer since 2005. He operates an IT Company Axis Direct Ltd www.axisdirect.nz which primarily develops applications using Xojo that integrate with Xero www.xero.com.  Wayne’s hobby is robotics where he uses Xojo to build applications for his Pi2 often implementing IoT for remote control.

Do you need to run a Xojo Application on Windows with Elevated UAC? Here’s Wayne’s trick to achieve that goal.

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GUEST POST: Testing a Windows Service Application with Xojo

When working with Windows services you’ll want to debug the application while it’s running as a service. To do this, you can Select Run Paused from the project menu, then create the windows service and start it. Now you’re debugging your app while it runs in service mode.

All of this takes time, and having to create/start the service each time slows down debugging considerably.

I have written a little utility that allows me to right click on the debug executable and automate the service creation and startup. You can download this utility from https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18858366/DebugService.zip. The source for the Xojo project is included. The utility accepts the executable path as its argument, creates a service “_test” and starts the service.

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A Modern Alternative to Visual Basic

Xojo is a great alternative to Microsoft Visual Basic. If you have used VB in the past or are considering using it now, you might want to take a look at Xojo to see if it will fit your needs better.

At Xojo, we strive to keep things simple. A single language to build apps for Mac, Windows and Linux desktop, plus web, iOS and Raspberry Pi (Android coming soon!). With Xojo you simply develop faster.

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More Important Than Ever: Cross-Platform’s History

There was a time when the idea of running the same code on different computers wasn’t even imagined. Programming languages were written specifically for a particular computer. And computers were purchased for very specific purposes so why would you even want to run a particular program on another type of computer?

It was the desktop computer revolution that changed that. By the mid-to-late 1980’s, there were more and more desktop computers and developers wanted to target all of them. Soon, however, Windows became so dominant that many developers chose to focus on that one OS. Some Mac developers, not wanting to miss out on the potentially enormous Windows market, either went to the trouble of writing two versions of their applications or used a tool/language that would allow them to target both Mac and Windows from a single code base. This was the beginning of cross-platform development.

Recently, I was asked by tech blogger Chris Pirillo if cross-platform was really important anymore. Cross-Platform is actually more important than ever. Why? First of all, while the Windows PC market is seeing flat or declining sales, Apple’s Mac marketshare is growing. We are seeing this at Xojo. More and more Windows developers are coming to us because they can no longer ignore the Mac market. Linux is the predominant server OS. If you want to write server software that can run on some combination of Linux, Windows and OS X, you’ll want to be writing cross-platform code.

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