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Category: Mac

Posts related to Max OS development.

IDE changes in Xojo 2018r3 and more

About three years ago, we added HiDPI/Retina support to our framework which was released to users as part of Xojo 2016r1 when we also shipped our first HiDPI IDE.

With Apple’s announcements at WWDC 2018 and the introduction of dark mode it was time to revisit our graphics and the overall appearance of the IDE again. Here are some things which contribute to the changes that have been made and ones that you will see in the coming months.

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Localize Your Edit Menu on Mac

On macOS you may have noticed two special menu items that appear at the bottom of the Edit menu: “Start Dictation” and “Emoji & Symbols”. These menu items are added automatically by macOS provided your Xojo app follows a few simple rules.

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The status of 32-bit and 64-bit macOS apps

In the Mac world, 32-bit apps have been disappearing more and more as time goes on. This year already we’ve seen significant steps toward 64-bit.

In January 2018 Apple stopped accepting 32-bit app submissions to the Mac App Store.

In February 2018, starting with macOS 10.13.4, Apple added a warning that displays the first time you launch a 32-bit app.

In June 2018 Apple stopped accepting updates to 32-bit apps in the Mac App Store. All new apps and app updates must now be 64-bit.

At WWDC 2018 Apple announced that macOS 10.14 will be the final version that support 32-bit apps. Although they did not announce a release date, based on the timing from the past few years macOS 10.14 will probably be released around the end of September 2018.

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Do you need an iMac Pro for Development?

Of course you want an iMac Pro! But do you really need one for your development work? Most of the iMac Pro videos and reviews seem to focus on video and audio editing, which are certainly tasks that make use of the many cores that are available (8-18).

But software development is also a Pro task. What benefits does an iMac Pro bring to a software developer?

Typically most people will opt for a computer that probably has four cores such as found in the i5 and i7 series. These are used in the popular Macbook Pro and iMac models, for example. Four cores sure sounds like a lot so why would a developer need more?

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What it means for your Xojo projects if Mac goes ARM

I’ve speculated for some time now that Apple might decide to start putting their own ARM-based processors in Mac desktop and laptop computers. Apparently, I’m not alone in thinking this. It makes a lot of sense. Apple’s big advantage is being in control of all of the important aspects of their product lines and the processor is both figuratively and physically at the center of their products.

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Clear the iTunes Apple Music Cache on macOS and Windows

I love listening to music and have been a happy Apple Music subscriber since it was first released in 2015. Having access to 30 million songs is great even if I mostly just listen to the ones in the “Hard Rock” category (current favorite song: You Don’t Know by Kobra and the Lotus). Unlike some other streaming services, when you listen to a song with iTunes that has not been downloaded to your computer, it does not technically stream it while it’s playing. Instead iTunes downloads the full song to a cache folder and plays it locally from there. This has the advantage of there being fewer stutters as the song is playing, but does mean it takes a moment before the song starts playing the first time. Subsequent plays of the same song are instant, though, since it doesn’t have to download it again which may also save you some Internet data usage. A notable downside to this design is that it also means that these songs are using up space on your drive and with today’s smaller SSDs often every bit of space counts. It doesn’t appear that this space is ever cleared by iTunes, either.

These songs files are saved in a cache folder buried in hidden folders on macOS and Windows, which you can get to manually if you are comfortable with the command line.

Alternatively, you can easily make a quick Xojo app to do it for you.

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