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Tag: Apple

Deploy iOS apps to your devices without an Apple Developer Membership

With the release of Xcode 7, Apple combined the iOS and Mac Developer programs into a single Developer Program. Previously these programs were $99/year for each and now they are $99/year for the combined Apple Developer Program which lets you create and deploy apps for iOS and OS X.

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Is Apple killing off mobile ads?

The issue of mobile ads is of particular interest to me as I am forced to think of mobile ads from three different perspectives. First, as a developer since Xojo can be used to create iOS apps; then as an entrepreneur because we advertise Xojo via mobile ads; but also as a personal consumer of mobile ads.

I think I’m on firm ground when I say that mobile ads are universally hated. We hate them more that TV commercials and certainly more than magazine ads. Why is this?

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Deploying iOS Apps Inside Your Company

While the iOS App Store is a great solution for commercial software, not all iOS apps are for public use. If you are building an app just for use inside your company, you won’t want to go through Apple’s app review process (which can take weeks) nor make your app available to the general public. How do you quickly and easily deploy an iOS app just for use by others in your organization?

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There and Back Again: The Evolution of the Graphical User Interface

30 years ago this past January, Apple launched the Macintosh and with it, the first widely available computer with a Graphical User Interface or GUI. If you are less than 25 years old, there’s a very good chance you’ve never used a computer that didn’t have a graphical user interface. But at the time, it was a radical departure from the way in which most people interacted with a computer. Over the past 30 years, the GUI has evolved and in some ways has come full circle.

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Merging iCloud and Apple ID Accounts

iCloud.jpegIf you have been around the Mac community long enough, you may have ended up with two Apple IDs. I have one for iTunes and another one that came from MobileMe. This resulted in effectively having two iCloud accounts. This can be inconvenient and probably will become more so in the future. Apple doesn’t provide a means to merge Apple IDs. They know they need to provide this, but they do not yet do so. I, however, have found a way.

Since the introduction of iCloud, I have wanted to have a single Apple ID. When Apple recently added the two-step authentication for Apple IDs to make them more secure, I decided to sign in and update my Apple ID account. Part of the process is to verify a device you own which will be used, along with your password, to authenticate that you are who you say you are should you want to make changes (such as your password) to your Apple ID in the future. The webpage said it would list my devices, but none were listed. It didn’t take long to figure out why. The Apple ID I was updating was for iTunes, while the Apple ID Apple was using to find my devices was the one associated with my iCloud (MobileMe/mac.com) account.

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The iOS 7 UI Controversy

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past week, you know that Apple unvieled iOS 7 and its new user interface coming this fall to an iOS device near you. While there are some great new features, like the engine in a car, it’s not the first thing people notice. Most car shoppers are looking at the color of the paint, the sleekness of the design, the look of the interior and dashboard, etc. In other words, they look at the cars’ UI.

The new UI in iOS 7 is the most controversial thing about it by far. I’ll admit that when I first saw it, I thought they were changing it just to change it. I thought they hadn’t put enough thought into the reasons why or they were just bending to the pressure of change for change’s sake. In my role at Xojo, I think at a lot about UI design. Before long, I realized that of course Apple put a lot of thought into it. That’s what Apple does. It’s their culture. So why were they going with this new, simpler, non-skeumorphic design?

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